1

Is there difference in meaning between "above" and "from above" in these two sentences?

The example below is identical to the example above, with one important difference.

The example below is identical to the example from above, with one important difference.

I wonder why "from above", rather than "above", is used in a sentence, and vice versa.

In this case, the author uses "from above", so the actual sentence that I encountered when reading a document is the second sentence. But in the same document, "above" is used as well, like this.

In the example above, --(some explanation)--.

or

In the above example, --(some explanation)--.

I guessed that "above" is used when a sentence is written just after the example which the sentence mentions, like this.

== First Example ==

The example below is identical to the example above, with one important difference.

== Second Example ==

And I also guessed that "from above" is used in a situation like this.

== First Example ==

--(some paragraph)--

--(another paragraph)--

The example below is identical to the example from above, with one important difference.

== Second Example ==

However, my guess seems wrong, because "above" and "from above" both seem to be used in both situations. Are they just replaceable and having exactly the same meaning?

Or, do "above" and "from above" have different meanings or nuances? If so, what is the difference?

I would like to use them correctly when I write sentences in English. So, would you please also tell me what condition makes someone choose "above" or "from above" to use in this kind of sentence?

2

In your first example, you would just use above, as an adverb is all that is needed. But it really only describes what is directly above.

In your second example, from above is not helpful because it is not specific as to what you are referring to. You should point to the specific location.

When using from above, from is a preposition, so I expect an object in that phrase. For example:

From above the trees, I could see the distant horizon.

The locations are specific. Also motion is often involved:

The birds flew from above the trees to the roof of our house.

There are some idiomatic usages though, for example:

Their new baby was a gift from above. (meaning from heaven)

  • I see. So, in the phrase "the example from above" of my question, is the last word of the phrase omitted? Does the "from above" mean "from above something" (like "from above the paragraph") actually? And is the "something" part of it omitted? – HiruneDiver Dec 20 '15 at 12:27

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