2
  1. I am very happy to have helped you.
  2. I'm very happy to be helped you.
  3. I'm very happy to help you.
  4. I was very happy to had helped you.

By the first sentence, I wanted to mean that I've helped someone right now, and I am happy for this.

By the second sentence I meant that I helped someone before, now I'm happy for this.

By the third sentence, I wanted to mean that I'll be happy if I get a chance to help you. Can I rewrite the third sentence in the following way without changing its meaning?

  • I'll be very happy to will have helped you/I will be very happy to help you/I'll be very happy to have helped you.

By the fourth sentence, I mean, I helped someone before, and in past I was happy for this.

Please tell what you think about my examples and about my explanation. If any correction is needed, please prescribe me.

  • I think the 3rd sentence does not imply "I would be happy to help you" ! – Cardinal Dec 23 '15 at 15:34
0

Let's analyse the cases:

  1. I am very happy to have helped you.

This shows you've helped someone but it doesn't matter when you did it. If that happened not that long, use recently.

  1. I am very happy to be helped you.

This is a passive sentence, meaning that someone did help you. It's crossed because we require the preposition by to show who performed the action. Hence, I am very happy to be helped by you

  1. I'm very happy to help you.

This shows you do this often (probably) and it's an habit. For instance, a person often needs help and you're there to.

  1. I was very happy to had helped you.

First you can't put to before had. If you attempt to show that something happened before another action in the past, you can say I was very happy I had helped you. (I helped you first and then my happiness came later.)

Another view provided by stangdon:

I was very happy to have helped you which implies that the happiness was in the past, but the helping was even further in the past than that.

  • I agree with most of your analysis. I'm not sure the OP realizes that #2 means something completely different than the other three. Another possible correction for #4, BTW, is "I was very happy to have helped you" which implies that the happiness was in the past, but the helping was even further in the past than that. – stangdon Dec 23 '15 at 16:21
  • @stangdon I've added that correction to my answer as well. – Alejandro Dec 23 '15 at 16:27
-1
  1. I am very happy to have helped you.

Because of "to have", this sentence would be used after help has been given. If the help is still ongoing, you could use the present participle helping: "I am very happy to be helping you."

  1. I'm very happy to be helped you.

Helped is the past participle, and in this case using "to have" instead of "to be" provides the feeling that help had happened before.

  1. I'm very happy to help you.

This sentence does not indicate future clearly. For future tense using will makes your intentions more clear: "I will be happy to help." Alternatively providing a time-frame will be beneficial: "I'm very happy to help you anytime." You may also use would as in "I would be very happy to help" since would acts as a hypothetical.

  1. I was very happy to had helped you.

This will use have as well: "I was very happy to have helped you." The only difference between this and number 1 is the fact that you are not longer happy about helping the person.

  • 1
    2 and 4 sound utterly wrong in the intended meaning. – Ghaith Alrestom Dec 23 '15 at 16:42

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