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For example,

My Question: Why are you not taking any leaves nowadays.
My colleague's reply: I am in notice period know.

Is it OK to use "Know" at the end of the sentence? Is it acceptable?

6
  • 1
    Are you from India ?
    – Varun Nair
    Commented Dec 28, 2015 at 11:06
  • 3
    What are you trying to say with know? For you sentence it seems you mean now
    – Peter
    Commented Dec 28, 2015 at 11:14
  • It's either , you know or now, otherwise it does not make sense. Commented Dec 28, 2015 at 11:30
  • 3
    I think you wanted to say you know.
    – Schwale
    Commented Dec 28, 2015 at 11:31
  • Yes Varun. I am from India.
    – Bala
    Commented Dec 28, 2015 at 12:36

1 Answer 1

1

I have two guesses. My first guess is that you have probably misheard the colleague. The correct form is "you know".

My Question: Why are you not taking any leaves nowadays?
My colleague's reply: I am in my notice period, you know.

From The Cambridge Dictionary:

We use you know very commonly in speaking. It is used to check with our listeners that we share the same knowledge. When we use you know, we assume that the listener or listeners do have the knowledge that we want them to have:

Well, what can I say, you know, I want my career to go far.

A: How was the match?
B: Well, they played OK but the defence was, you know, the same as always.

You know is also sometimes used to allow us time to think when we are speaking:

A: Did you like the play?

B: Well, I’m not sure, it was, you know, it was interesting.

The dictionary has a nice page on discourse markers.


My second guess is that if it's not you know, then it might be now. If it's just know, it seems to make no sense in that position.

With now, the dialogue looks like this:

My Question: Why are you not taking any leaves nowadays.
My colleague's reply: I am in my notice period now.

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