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I am Sorry but this question came across my mind when I was asking a computer question in Super User site.
Previosuly, I was writing this

The person who will build the PC for me asked me some question about something like faster Hard Disk, I don't know what exactly he meant, but I have written down what he said, it is called SSD.

I did not jot down important notes during the conversation between the man and I, but later on, I tried to remember what he said and then I wrote down on a paper. Both the conversation and the action that I wrote the notes are already past, so I think I should use past tense and write it this way,
"I don't know what exactly he meant, but I had written down what he said"

But, I doubt if it is grammatically correct and if it can happen in reality, because it sounds like my writing action had finsihed before our conversation began (unless I had some kind of magical power to accurately predict someone's speech)

Thank you.

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    Your past-tense sentence is accurate, if you want to take that route. Also, a solid state drive is preferred. Cheers. – lurker Dec 28 '15 at 21:20
  • How about just writing "but I wrote down what he said"? I am trying to understand why you want to use perfect tense, since the time relationships are vague. – user3169 Dec 29 '15 at 1:13
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    Kitty, check out this question and answer. I would suggest to go with simple past: "I don't know what exactly he meant, but I wrote down what he said" as User3169 suggested. – Usernew Dec 29 '15 at 7:10
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I don't know what exactly he meant, but I had written down what he said
I didn't know exactly what he meant, but I wrote down what he said

are both ambiguous in terms of the timing of your note taking

I didn't know exactly what he meant, but afterwards I wrote down what he said

removes the ambiguity.

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