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This question already has an answer here:

Which one is correct and what's the difference?

What would you say if someone asked you what you were doing yesterday:

I was shopping at a convenience store yesterday.

I was shopping in a convenience store yesterday.

I was doing the shopping at a convenience store yesterday.

I was doing the shopping in a convenience store yesterday.

or what you did yesterday:

I did the shopping at a convenience store yesterday.

I did the shopping in a convenience store yesterday.

marked as duplicate by Nathan Tuggy, ColleenV, pyobum, Varun Nair, Usernew Dec 30 '15 at 6:41

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migrated from english.stackexchange.com Dec 29 '15 at 14:22

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  • Both are OK. There may be a slight difference in meaning. – GEdgar Dec 26 '15 at 22:44
  • The denotations are the same, but 'I was shopping at a convenience store yesterday.' does not conjure up a picture of the location the way 'I was shopping in a convenience store yesterday.' might. The first is the unmarked, clinical version. – Edwin Ashworth Dec 26 '15 at 23:44
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    The OP's previous question, At a shop or in a shop?. Any reason to ask the same question? – user24743 Dec 27 '15 at 5:16
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I'm not the world's greatest English expert, but I'm a stickler for brevity. ;)

"I was doing the shopping" and "I did the shopping" are really lame. It's better to say "I shopped at a convenience store yesterday."

For me personally, at sounds slightly better than in, for some reason. But they really mean the same thing. If you tell us you shopped AT a store, we assume you were INSIDE the store. That's why "in" sounds a little redundant to me.

However, it works both ways - if you tell us you shopped IN a store we assume you were AT the store.

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