2

I do not have a camera, so I cannot take pictures.

How would the above sentence be converted to if-clause? Specifically the 'cannot' part. Would it be -

If I had a camera, I could take pictures.

or

If I had a camera, I could have taken pictures.

or

If I have had a camera, I could take/have taken pictures.

Which of the above is correct? All of them look senseful to me.

4

The simplest way and the way that most closely matches the original sentence would be as follows:

If I do not have a camera, I cannot take pictures.

Unless someone is asking you to use the subjunctive mood, then I would say you should keep the original sentence's present indicative verb tenses.

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  • Hi, Benjamin, I agree with your answer and upvote it. But learners do learn about the mood even though it is not absolutely necessary in the context. It is also used in English albeit in different context. I think it would be better to include some explanation using one of the three sentences suggested by the OP. – user24743 Jan 5 '16 at 8:37
  • I have doubt, if i am right, then the sentence you mentioned and the sentence in the question point out to slightly different sense. The sentence in the question is expressing the condition that has happened like I didn't had camera so I could not take pictures then, but in your sentence it is expressing the condition that could happen. – Sarthak123 Jan 6 '16 at 6:53
2

The following sentences are all understandable to mean that since you did not have a camera, you could not take pictures

If I had a camera, I could take pictures.
If I had a camera, I could have taken pictures.
If I had had a camera, I could have taken pictures.

If I have had a camera, I could take/have taken pictures.

Is ungrammatical and never used, from my experience.

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  • 1
    Hi, Peter, I think the OP is asking about the present tense indicative sentence. "Since I don't have a camera, I can't take pictures". – user24743 Jan 5 '16 at 7:44
  • How can all those sentences have the same sense? especially the first and second one, could and could have should express different meaning I think? – Sarthak123 Jan 6 '16 at 6:55

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