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She is a more talkative girl than any other girl in the class.

The sentence repeats the word "girl". Is it natural in English? How should I rewrite the sentence? Thanks a lot.

closed as off-topic by user24743, Glorfindel, Chenmunka, JMB, Brian Tompsett - 汤莱恩 Jan 7 '16 at 11:52

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  • 3
    She's the most talkative girl in the class! Works? – Maulik V Jan 7 '16 at 6:34
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    You could say: She talks more than any other girl in the class. – onlyforthis Jan 7 '16 at 6:55
  • She is more talkative than any other girl in the class. – MMacD Feb 2 '17 at 17:02
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"She is more talkative than any other girl in class."

Or, "She is the most talkative girl in class."

This is a common way to express such comparisons. You don't need to repeat the description of the thing it is you're comparing. Like if I said, "XYZ Corporation sells more cars than any other car company", it is clear from the "any other" that XYZ is also a car company. I don't need to say, "XYZ is a car company that sells more cars than any other car company" or otherwise repeat myself.

In this example, the fact that the subject is "she" indicates that the person in question is a girl, so there's a double reason to not have to identify her as a girl.

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