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I got two sentences below:

  1. Steve's boss will personally supervise to ensure that they will complete an important project by Monday.

  2. Steve's boss will personally supervise them to ensure that they finish an important project by Monday.

Is it grammatically OK to use will in the clause after ensure or does it carry a different meaning than the second sentence?

  • Since "supervising" is a continuous activity, I would use will. – user3169 Jan 7 '16 at 17:33
  • The fact that supervising is continuous is implied in both sentences. – Max Goodridge Jan 8 '16 at 13:01
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Both of your sentences are grammatically correct, however I would rather say:

Steve's boss will personally supervise to ensure that they do complete an important project by Monday.

This is because in this context you are trying to emphasise that Steve and his coworkers have got to get the project done. In most cases however, it reads more fluently if you say:

Steve's boss will personally supervise to ensure that they complete an important project by Monday.

Note that there is a specified deadline for the task by Monday.

OR

Steve's boss will personally supervise to ensure that they will complete an important project.

Here the use of will implies that will do the project at some point in the future, but there is no deadline specified yet.

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