3

By this time next year we will have been being on this committee
for a decade.

Is it correct to use future perfect progressive tense in this sentence?

  • 1
    Being appears redundant. A word associated with committee members is sitting. "...Will have been sitting..." – lurker Jan 8 '16 at 8:44
  • 2
    @lurker - but as a proof of concept, it seems to be okay. – CowperKettle Jan 8 '16 at 8:51
2

Warning: A Capital Community College website is spreading the following false information:

  • There is no future perfect progressive for the "to be" verb. "Will have been being" is expressed simply as "will have been": "By this time next year we will have been on this committee for a decade."

The truth is, you CAN use "to be" in the future perfect progressive, but only IF it is the action verb "to be" which is used when someone is acting like something, and not the state verb "to be" which is the normal use. STATE verbs are never progressive.

e.g.: in the sentence "John is an adult, but John is being a child." the first verb is a STATE verb, the second is an ACTION verb.

The answer to the question is "no" because "to be on a committee" is a STATE.

STATE:

  • John is on a committee.

  • John has been on the committee for 5 days.

  • On Saturday, John will have been on the committee for 1 week.

ACTION: (John is 30. He is an adult, but he is acting like a child.)

  • John is being a child.

  • John has been being a child for 5 days.

  • On Saturday, John will have been being a child for 1 week.

It would be incorrect to change that last sentence to "John will have been a child for 1 week" as that would be stating that John IS a child.

To recap:

  • STATE: John will have been an adult for 10 years next year.
  • ACTION: John will have been being a child for 1 week on Saturday.
  • I'm not sure why state verbs wouldn't be allowed to be continuous. The examples you gave appears grammatically and semantically fine. Perhaps redundant or potentially false, but still composed correctly. – Harris May 9 '18 at 17:15
1

The sentence is grammatically incorrect. It is better to say:

By this time next year we will have been on this committee for a decade.

  • 1
    It's interesting to note that this only applies this exact way to being, because being already means "existing". If the verb were "eating", then it would be correct to say "We will have been eating". – stangdon Jan 8 '16 at 14:00
  • So, we do not use future perfect progressive tense of "to be" in any sentence. – Onyx Jan 8 '16 at 15:03
  • Sorry but I know nothing about the future perfect progressive tense, I'm just English! – Max Goodridge Jan 8 '16 at 15:06
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    @Onyx - I can't think of too many cases in which I would say I will have been being! Maybe if it were being used in a passive construction, like "As of next Thursday, I will have been being watched by the FBI for a whole year." But that's an uncommon and clumsy phrasing. In this case, because the present tense is just "I am on the committee" (not "I am being on the committee"), it's more correct to say "I will be on the committee" (not "I will be being on the committee") and "I will have been on the committee", not "I will have been being on the committee." – stangdon Jan 8 '16 at 16:14

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