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It was in a class. I waited for my teacher and when he came I told him, "I had been waiting for you for the last ten minutes and you came now."

Is it grammatical because the wait is over in the past or should I have used "I have been waiting for you for the last ten minutes and you came now"? I think "have been" + -ing is used when the wait is still on.

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    Present Perfect Continuous (have/has been + ing) is used when the action is still going on or has just finished. Therefore it's what you need in your context. Another indicator that you need present perfect continuous is the phrase "for the last ten minutes":
    – Armen Ծիրունյան
    Jul 3, 2013 at 8:55
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    What @Armen said. When the person you are waiting for walks into the room, best go with "I've been waiting for ten minutes, and..." If the remark is made later (say, after you both have exited the building and are walking toward a car in the parking lot), then you'd say "I'd been waiting for ten minutes, and..."
    – J.R.
    Jul 3, 2013 at 9:18
  • Ditto Armen and JR. "Had been" is usually used when we are also discussing some other event that happened later. Like, "I had been waiting for ten minutes when it began to rain."
    – Jay
    Jul 3, 2013 at 15:49
  • Your two halves conflict. Your first part is about something that already completed. Your second part is about something that just happened. It's like there's an implied "already" before "been". Jul 4, 2013 at 5:47

1 Answer 1

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The consensus from the comments is:

  • The first clause should be cast in the Present perfect continuous, "I have been waiting", since the action runs right up to the moment of speaking.

Note that the second clause needs to be coordinated with the first:

I have been waiting for you for the last ten minutes and now you have come.

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