3

I tried to find it out by myself, but I didn't succeed. Probably, because I didn't really know for what I should search.

I want to talk about the location of a place, which I visited in the past, but the place still exists.

It works the best with an example, I guess. Which one is better:

  1. Our hostel was located in a messy area with many abandoned houses.
  2. Our hostel is located in a messy area with many abandoned houses.
  3. ?

My context is the following:

  • I'm writing a letter to a friend.
  • I'm telling this friend about our visit in a hostel, which still exists.
  • Frist one means that the place is no longer there. Probably demolished. – Alejandro Jan 10 '16 at 19:35
  • @Ustanak Not so: it does not address whether the hostel still exists. – StoneyB Jan 10 '16 at 20:12
  • @StoneyB Oh, that's true. – Alejandro Jan 10 '16 at 20:12
0

It depends on the context. If you are writing a description of your trip, and this is merely one word in the description, 1. Our hostel was located in a messy area with many abandoned houses. is perfectly correct, and readily understandable.

If you want to write one sentence, that is totally specific you could write

  • The hostel we stayed at was located in a messy area with many abandoned houses.
  • Or We stayed at a hostel which was located in a messy area with many abandoned houses.
  • Neither states that the hostel "still exists" as asked in the question. – user3169 Jan 10 '16 at 20:29
  • 1
    The question, as stated in the title is what I answered. As I understood the question, he just wanted to talk about a building that he visited in the past. Whether it still exists or not does not change the construction of the sentence. The context around the sentence is important. I believe, that perhaps, he thought there might be a different construction of the sentence depending on whether the building was still there or not, as is sometime the case in other languages. – Msfolly Jan 11 '16 at 3:08
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    @Msfolly: Yes, that's why I'm asking. I don't want to say, that the hostel doesn't exists anymore, but it sounds like I say that, when I write "Our hostel was..". – Robin Jan 11 '16 at 8:18
  • Okay, then. I stand by my answer. Whether or not a bulldozer wipes the hostel you stayed at off the map today has nothing to do with how you would construct a sentence about where it was to a friend in a letter. The "still exists" part of the subsequent explanation was sort of a red herring to the intended question as stated in your title. How nice that you are taking time to write a friend in your non-native language... – Msfolly Jan 12 '16 at 11:32

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