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I have a sentence:

Comparatively large group of people (13%) choose public transport when commuting to school or attending Holy Mass and the same number choose it when they go shopping.

I am not sure which form to choose - "the same number choose" or "the same number chooses". The number refers to the people, but I don't know: if the word "number" refers to a group of people, but the word "people" is not mentioned after the "number", is plural of the verb correct? Could someone of you tell me which form should I choose?

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    On the side, I would say "in Poland it is evening now". – user3169 Jan 10 '16 at 21:50
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"A comparatively large group of people (13%) choose public transportation when commuting to school or attending Holy Mass, and the same number choose it when they go shopping." (Please note the requirement of the article "A" at the beginning of the sentence, and the comma between the first and second clauses. I also changed "transport" to "transportation" purely to reflect my stylistic preference, not because it was wrong.)

This is a good example of when to "bend the rules" of English grammar and usage. It is clear from the content that the subject is plural, despite both "group" and "number" being singular in themselves. I would go with it as you have written it, with the few changes noted above. Good job!

  • Actually, transportation would be better. Thank you for checking this sentence, making it more appropriate and dispelling my doubts. – Paweł Jan 10 '16 at 22:15
  • You are very welcome! – Mark Hubbard Jan 10 '16 at 22:18

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