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A wettable surface may be termed hydrophilic, and non-wettable surface may be termed hydrophobic. Can I rewrite this sentence in the following way?

A wettable surface may be termed hydrophilic, and a non-wettable surface hydrophobic.

Is the above sentence right? I have another query about the usage of as in the above sentence. If I introduce an as in the above sentence, please tell me what will happen.

A wettable surface may be termed as hydrophilic, and a non-wettable surface can be termed as hydrophobic.

Is the usage of as in the above sentence wrong? If it is wrong, please let me know why it is wrong.

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  • I think it is OK. termed is giving a name. No relationship (what as would do) is needed. Also no need to repeat termed in the second phrase.
    – user3169
    Jan 11, 2016 at 4:14

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What I enjoy most about the first sentence is its economy of words. It could be trimmed even further via, "...and non-wettable surfaces hydrophobic." But that is six of one and a half dozen of the other.

The second sentence is fine albeit a bit clunky. If it comes down to preference, I always side with the clearly understood sentence using the least amount of words.

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