3

Most of the time, the simple or progressive present tense is not used in the main clause, when there is a since clause:

Correct: I have been here since morning.
Correct: I have been waiting here since morning.
Incorrect: *I am here since morning.
Incorrect: *I am waiting here since morning.

But sometimes the non-perfect tense seems alright, as in:

1: Last night you were so pale, but You are looking so much better since morning.
2: Last night you were so pale, but You have been looking so much better since morning.

I think the first sentence indicates that the situation is changing (the person's getting better and better).

And sometimes the non-perfect tense sounds even more eligible, as in:

You are the first student to get an A from that teacher since 2010.
? You have been the first student to get an A from that teacher since 2010.

So, when exactly can/should we use a non-perfect tense with since?

-1

There's two different but closely related meanings here. The first is that something has been happening over a period of time, and the other is that something hasn't been happening over a period of time, but is happening now. The first uses perfect, the second uses present.

Edit: Also, be careful of what is being said. "You are the valedictorian of the Class of 2016." That's something that will continue to be true until 2060, or so. When the guy dies, then it's only true that he was the valedictorian. In the meantime, you could use either. The present man is the valedictorian of that class, and him as the new graduate was the valedictorian then, too.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.