1

(1) Whole conversation during the meeting will be done by english.
(2) Whole conversation during the meeting will be done with english
(3) Whole conversation during the meeting will be done in english

Among (1)~(3), which one is grammatically right if I am trying to choose a sentence which has same meaning with 'Whole conversation during the meeting will go along with english.'?

Or if all are incorrect, what is a right form?

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  • 1
    If you want to be fancy: "The meeting will be conducted in English."
    – lurker
    Jan 19, 2016 at 4:54
  • Think of this option as said by @lurker. This sounds better!
    – Maulik V
    Jan 19, 2016 at 4:57

3 Answers 3

2

Looking at the context, to convey the following sentence:

Whole conversation during the meeting will go along with English.

You need to use the third option because here you want to convey that language of conversation is English.

Therefore,

Whole conversation during the meeting will be done in English.

Rest two options don't seem correct to me.

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  • Thank you for your kind answer. If you don't mind, I want to ask one more question. Then what is the precise meaning of option 1 and option 2? Which occasion are they used in? Jan 19, 2016 at 4:53
  • The first and second options are correct when you use 'English' as a person, i.e. a person native of the Great Britain. If you want to consider 'English' as a language, then the third option is right. Check Maulik V's answer for more clarity on this.
    – Rucheer M
    Jan 19, 2016 at 4:58
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In this case you want "in". The conversation will be done in the English language. One way to think of it is to use "in" when the subject in question could be described as immersing the user(s) (literally or otherwise). For instance, the statement "We will drive to the airport using this car" is equivalent to "We will drive to the airport in this car".

"With" also works in both cases, but is less correct. "With" is better used when the subject is assisting either discretely or remotely, such as in "I will call you with my phone."

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In any case, 'e' will be capital.

The question is about a proper preposition. Now, what's 'English' in your sentence? The language or a person native of The Great Britain?

If it's the language, the preposition 'in' goes with it.

*Whole conversation during the meeting will be done in English.*

If it's a person, 'English' serves as an adjective. And, it takes the preposition 'from'.

Whole conversation during the meeting will be done from an English teacher/lecturer etc.

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