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One company developed what it called a 'technology shelf', created by a few enginerrs, on which [was placed/were placed/placed] possible techinical solutions that other teams might use in the future.

According to the guildeline, it is said that 'were placed' was grammatically correct, because the subject of the sentence is 'possible technical solutions' as inversion happened in the relative clause.

However, I feel somewhat awkward about the it, and still can't understand that the inversion could happen in the relative clause with preposition.

If so, why not always does the inversion happen in relative clause with prepostion?

  • Can you give us an example of a relative clause with a preposition that doesn't invert the subject and verb? – modulusshift Jan 19 '16 at 8:33
  • @modulusshift - "One company developed what it called a 'technology shelf', created by a few enginerrs, on which possible techinical solutions that other teams might use in the future were placed." – CowperKettle Jan 19 '16 at 8:57
  • Oh, right. So yeah, either works. – modulusshift Jan 19 '16 at 17:00
1

On the inside of the door to the rest room stall someone had scratched a lewd drawing, to which a funny balloon caption had been added.

On the inside of the door to the rest room stall someone had scratched a lewd drawing, to which had been added a funny balloon caption.

Both are legit. The latter was more popular in previous centuries than it is today.

  • And what did the funny balloon caption say? :-) – Mark Hubbard Jan 20 '16 at 6:17

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