2

The following question is from the book, A Very Wimpy Kid. Lina likes eating. Her boyfriend asked her

"Is all you think about is food?"

If this is not correct, how about the following one? It seems it is weird to ask like this way.

"Is all you think about food?"

and also followings are weird to me:

  • Is the day after tomorrow the first day of school?

  • Is she the chair of the department?

  • Is this book yours?

Sometimes, I think followings are more native.

  • The day after tomorrow is the first day of school?

  • She is the chair of the department?

  • This book is yours?

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  • 4
    The sentence is colloquial but not sound syntax. The proper question would be "Is food all you think about?" – Hot Licks Jan 8 '16 at 3:36
  • How about: Is the day after tomorrow the first day of school? – studyhard Jan 8 '16 at 3:38
  • 3
    That is proper syntax and reasonably well phrased. – Hot Licks Jan 8 '16 at 3:39
  • How about asking questions like this way: The day after tomorrow is the first day of school? She is the chair of the department? This book is yours? – studyhard Jan 8 '16 at 3:47
  • 1
    When you ask in that order you depend on the tone of voice (if spoken) or the presence of the question mark (when written) to identify the sentence as a question rather than a declarative statement. – Hot Licks Jan 8 '16 at 4:10
9

The three that you think are "weird" are correct:

Is the day after tomorrow the first day of school?
Is she the chair of the department?
Is this book yours?

and much better than the ones you think are "more native."
Questions often flip the order of verb and subject.

3

Not every grammatically correct question can be turned into a statement without rearranging the words. However, every grammatically correct statement can be turned into a question just by adding a question mark.
 

Without rearranging, these 'weird' ones must be questions. None of these can be statements:

Is the day after tomorrow the first day of school?
Is she the chair of the department?
Is this book yours?

 

Without rearranging, these 'more native' ones can be either questions or statements:

The day after tomorrow is the first day of school?
She is the chair of the department?
This book is yours?

 

This one is halfway rearranged:

Is all you think about is food?

 

This is the question form:

Is all you think about food?

 

This is the statement form:

All you think about is food.

 

I don't really see anything happening here that is weird or not native. Except for that halfway rearranged line.

Changing a statement into a question can rearrange word order but it doesn't have to. Done correctly it sounds just as native either way.

1

All you think about is food.

Is all you think about is food?

The above would be fairly common in informal speech, and easily understood. Most people would probably not notice it as peculiar. But many would likely say that it varies from standard grammar patterns. We can perhaps more easily see how it's nonstandard by simplifying the structure to:

Is everything is ok?

At the same time, we can see why it would be said if we understand that questions are formed generally by inverting subject-verb order, and we recognize the following declarative sentence as standard:

It's all you can think about, food is.

We can render the question onto more solid standard ground in several ways:

Is that all you can think about, food?

Is that all you can think about, food is?

Is food all you can think about?

2.

Is all you think about food?

This is standard grammar, structurally like

Is everything you eat food?

But it is not easy to interpret correctly because it the subject is long and contains a verb. We are more likely to understand it with a short dummy subject:

Is that/it all you think about, food?

The remaining questions are all grammatical. The most common and standard question forms are the firt triplet:

Is X Y?

Is tomorrow Saturday? Is she the mayor? Is this mine?

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