0

"I want to discuss this with you" or "I want discuss this with you". I'm not specific about this sentence. I catches myself saying often for example "I want o write you a letter" instead of "I want write you a letter" and so on and feel, it my be not correct. Background: I'm a German native speaker, perhaps there is somethings specific in German, which I try to translate into English? You see it, in the last sentence I use "try to translate" 🤔

3
  • 1
    You should say "Want to" and "Try to translate" Jan 24, 2016 at 8:32
  • If you can't proofread your own question title and question body for typos then it comes across as unappealing to answer. Why bother, if you aren't going to bother
    – GoDucks
    Jan 24, 2016 at 11:31
  • @GoDucks Now it is ok? Jan 24, 2016 at 12:25

1 Answer 1

3

There are Some verbs that are followed by the to-infinitive:

I decided to go home as soon as possible. We all wanted to have more English classes.

Common verbs followed by the to-infinitive are:

Verbs of thinking and feeling:

choose
decide
expect
forget
hate
hope
intend
learn
like
love
mean
plan
prefer
remember
would like
would love

Verbs of saying:

agree
promise
refuse

Other common verbs are:

arrange
attempt
fail
help
manage
tend
try
want

https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/ar/english-grammar/verbs/verbs-followed-infinitiveenter link description here

2
  • 3
    If you copied this answer from somewhere else, please cite your sources appropriately. For more information, see How to reference material written by others. Thank you. Jan 24, 2016 at 12:47
  • It is not necessary to give lists of verbs with to-infinitive as the to-infinitive is the normal thing. You have to know the dozen verbs where you use the bare infinitive. And you have to know the verbs with gerund instead of to-infinitive.
    – rogermue
    Jan 24, 2016 at 14:53

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .