4

The whole context (from Learning OpenCV Computer Vision in C++ with the OpenCV Library (Early Release)):

Here are the current modules:

...

contrib: This module contains new things that have yet to be blessed into the whole of the library.

legacy: This module contains old things that have yet to be banished from the library altogether.

...

I can understand the sentence like "God bless you", but how to understand the code is blessed? who blessed the code? and what is the meaning of something blessed into something?

  • Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/392135/… – Damkerng T. Jan 27 '16 at 14:14
  • @DamkerngT. Interesting. But in that SO post they didn't explain the meaning of bless in semantic. – Sayakiss Jan 27 '16 at 14:34
  • When someone said bless and banish in the context of programming, I'd guess that they've worked with Perl before. I think the author of the excerpt used that kind of lingo. I could be wrong in details, but I don't think I was very far off. – Damkerng T. Jan 27 '16 at 14:38
  • @DamkerngT. I'm confused with the yet there. Does it mean: up to now, these new things are not included by other module so blessed into the contrib module? – Sayakiss Jan 27 '16 at 14:48
  • 1
    Ahh... that yet could be another question! But I think this definition could help: have yet to do something: used for saying that something has not happened or been done up to the present time, especially when you think it should have happened or been done – Damkerng T. Jan 27 '16 at 14:51
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Because I've sort of answered in the comments (even though I didn't intend to at first), I think I should wrap those up as an answer.

Judging from the context, which is a programming context, I believe that the author uses those words because they're understandable among programmers. (For more background of bless, which is related to the Perl programming language, check out What exactly does Perl's “bless” do? And bless basically means to associate a reference with a package.)

We can understand these two words like this:

blessed into = put into, included in
banished from = removed/excluded from

As to "who blessed the code?", it would be whoever is responsible for the maintenance of the code base.

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