1

For example: "By the time these clothes fit me, they..."

  1. will probably have been out of fashion

  2. probably will have been out of fashion

  • There would usually be a time-phrase in such statements, such as "for a year or two" and immediately before such a phrase is another place where probably can appear. Those hats will have been out of fashion probably for a year or two when you finally decide to buy one. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jan 30 '16 at 14:17
  • I think you mean clothes, not cloths, which generally means separate pieces of material, not garments. – Msfolly Jan 30 '16 at 14:46
  • "will be out of fashion" sounds better to me unless you add "out of fashion for ..." to qualify that. I think you're ok with either choice in your original question though. – shawnt00 Jan 30 '16 at 18:09
1

The "probably" can go in either position.

By the time these clothes fit me, they..."

1a. will probably be out of fashion. 1b. probably will be out of fashion

2a. will probably have been out of fashion for x amount of time. 2b. probably will have been out of fashion for x amount of time.

As you can see, "the probably" can be in either postition.

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  • Well, I see that the original question has been edited somewhat, so my answers to number 1. with the 'be' in it does not make as much sense as it did... – Msfolly Jan 30 '16 at 22:22
  • Is there some difference between a ("will probably") and b ("probably will")? At least tiny one? – Sasha Nov 22 '16 at 11:06

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