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I´d like to know whether I could say these two sentences:

  1. However, I have calculated that in order to complete the exercises suggested, it would take closer to....

  2. However, I have calculated that in order to complete the suggested exercises, it would take closer to....

To my ears both sound pretty good.

Would be there any difference between these two kinds of sentences?

Because in the example I give below I was told there was significant difference. However I don´t see any. Would it be possible to explain it to me please?

"The concerned people are looking forward to seeing this event"

versus

"The people concerned are looking forward to seeing this event".

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    "The suggested exercises" choice sounds better, but both are correct. There is no significant difference in meaning between these two choices. – Msfolly Jan 30 '16 at 18:53
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'Suggested' really only has one meaning, so in the first example, the two sentences are identical in meaning.

In your other example, however, with concerned people, there is indeed a significant difference; concerned can either mean worried (as an adjective), or to simply be involved with or affected by something (as a verb). So, when you say "...the concerned people..." it sounds like you are talking about people who are worried about something, and that they are looking forward to the event. However, when you say "...the people concerned..." it sounds as though you are talking about people who are involved with something, and that they are looking forward to the event.

Essentially, by putting 'concerned' before 'people', you put it in a place where it is likely to be recognized as an adjective. When you place 'people' before 'concerned', you place the word 'concerned' in a place where it is likely to be recognized as a participle, and this alters the meaning significantly.

Alternatively, you could say:

"The people, concerned, are looking forward to seeing this event"

but that would give the same meaning as "The concerned people are looking forward to seeing this event." Native English speakers wouldn't say this in conversation, but perhaps in a book, as it's a more formal way to phrase that sentence.

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