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I know that if you are asking about the subject, you don't use the auxiliary verb. For instance, we ask

What time tomorrow sounds good to you to meet?

But here when I wanted to ask about the earliest time you can meet, I feel the compulsion to use the auxiliary verb "is" after "what".

What is the earliest time tomorrow that sounds good to you to meet?

But I keep saying to myself this wrong because of the addition of "is". However, if I omit it, it sounds as if something is missing.

What the earliest time tomorrow sounds good to you to meet?

Am I wrong in my feeling?

  • Stangdon's answer is correct. Also, you could shorten the sentence for informal settings by omitting "time", as in "What's the earliest you can meet tomorrow?" – Kevin Feb 5 '16 at 18:17
  • @Kevin In that case, I would change "What's …" to "When is …" – 200_success Feb 5 '16 at 23:12
  • @200_success Either "what" or "when" sounds equally fine to me in that situation. "time" is implied when using "what" – Kevin Feb 5 '16 at 23:50
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What is the earliest time tomorrow that sounds good to you to meet?

is perfectly correct. Yes, you have to use "is". Think of it this way: you wouldn't say "What your name?" or "What the answer?", would you? It's a simple question: What is (noun-phrase)? that just looks more complicationed than it is, because in this case, noun-phrase is "the earliest time that sounds good to you to meet."

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