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A quite common structure in logical argument, is "name1, hence name2, verb". I am wondering about the correct form of the verb following such a structure when such a structure is a subject.

Should we always use plural, as if it was "name1 and name2"? Or singular when name1 (or both name1 and name2?) is singular.

For example, which of the following is correct?

My parents have the same religion. My father, hence my mother, is catholic.

or

My parents have the same religion. My father, hence my mother, are catholic.

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    You may be trying to say "My father, and hence my mother, is catholic." This implies a causal relationship - because your father is catholic, and (implied) your mother follows what you're dad does, your mother is catholic. However, in the sentence, the "is catholic" applies to the father. – Alex K Feb 2 '16 at 6:00
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    @AlexK +1 My father is Catholic, hence so is my mother – Peter Feb 2 '16 at 6:20
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    I think My father, hence my mother is fine. The OP states that such a construction is common in logical argument. Does someone have experience in the technical language of this field of philosophy to intelligently state they are wrong? – Jim Reynolds Feb 2 '16 at 7:10
  • @Taladris: Can you cite a real example of this structure in the wild? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Feb 2 '16 at 10:05
  • I see this as along the lines of My parents have the same religion. My father, along with my mother, is a Catholic. It might be clearer if your first sentence was My parents each have the same religion. – GoDucks Feb 2 '16 at 18:15
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[NB: the OP seems to have changed using Catholic (in the title, as in Rome) with catholic (in the question, as in orthodoxy). I am answering using catholic (as a noun) with no intended disrespect to Catholics]

The correct sentence of your two examples is

My parents have the same religion. My father, hence my mother, is catholic.

The underlying sentence (main clause) is

My father ... is catholic.

the subordinate clause is

hence my mother (is also)
therefore my mother (is also)
thus my mother (is also)

making the subject of the sentence singular: My father.

Your use of hence is to mean therefore, thus, or so to show causality

Hence is an conjunctive adverb and is usually used to connect the two clauses

My father is catholic hence my mother is also catholic
My father is catholic therefore my mother is also catholic

My father is catholic hence my mother converted
My father is catholic therefore my mother converted

are correct to support the fact both parents have the same religion.

My father and my mother are catholic
My parents are catholic hence my religion.

are also correct.

The sentence

My father is catholic hence my mother

could mean that because your father is catholic he married your mother (for whatever reason)

  • Great explanation! For the reference, the title is not mine. I meant "catholic" in my example. – Taladris Feb 3 '16 at 8:57

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