1

A sentence like

We've known each other since 2015

sounds common and normal. However, could you explain the possible circumstances of using a sentence with 2 Present Perfect clauses linked by "since" of this kind:

I've become suicidal again since I've worked here
I've been feeling down since you've been gone

I think I can somehow feel the meaning but I'd appreciate a native speaker's advice.
With regards,
Anabel

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1

"I've been feeling down since you've been gone" is odd; you shouldn't really link two present perfect clauses. I think it would be better to say:

"Since you left, I've been feeling down." or "I've felt sad ever since you left." or: "Ever since I started working here, I've felt suicidal."

I think it's more elegant to pinpoint an event after which another event has started to take effect.

0

"Since" wants a specific time or event. "You've been gone" is not an event. "You left" is an event. So, "since you left" works.

  • I follow your reasoning, but to my ears, "I've been feeling down since you've been gone" sounds perfectly normal as a sentence. Also, if it is true that "since" wants a specific time or event, and "you've been gone" doesn't qualify, then why are there so many songs with the phrase "since you've been gone" in them? – Lorel C. Mar 15 at 3:36

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