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...One of the earliest and biggest, at the time, use of the battery was enlightening the world’s Columbian exposition with 250,000 light bulbs in 1893, but we might have used the batteries way before that...

I wrote this and the "we might have used..." part feels wrong for me. is it? is there any better way to express that?

here I wrote "might" to express that I'm not sure

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    You are using might correct to show uncertainty: we might have used batteries way before that, no need to use the – Peter Feb 7 '16 at 22:35
  • I agree with Peter's comment regarding the grammar, but stylistically, I hope that the next sentence has to do with that uncertainty. This sentence alone can be read in a number of ways. Depending on the form of the uncertainty involved "we might have used" may or may not be the best way of expressing your idea. – Jason Patterson Feb 7 '16 at 22:56
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If you (or we in the sentence) are currently unsure whether batteries were used, use may. To me, the uncertainty exists in the present tense.

One of the earliest and biggest, at the time, use of the battery was enlightening the world’s Columbian exposition with 250,000 light bulbs in 1893, but we may have used the batteries way before that...

If we and the uncertainty existed in the past - you would use might.

Being currently uncertain about a past event does not make the uncertainty exist in the past even though it's tempting to make the words harmonize in tenses.

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