1

Does "it's live" mean something that someone would say it at a party?

And "it's on live" means to be broadcasting at the same time, as in live news?

In the following sentence:

I wanted to ask my teacher if this online class is going to be on live/live,

which one should I use?

2

You can use either one.

I wanted to ask my teacher if this online class is going to be live.

live means it is not "prerecorded". You can also use this for a party:

I wanted to ask my friend if the entertainment at the party is going to be live.

live means there will be in-person performances, as opposed to recorded music or such.

And the other case...

I wanted to ask my teacher if this online class is going to be on (TV) live.

Where TV is understood and could be left out. Here on refers to the medium used (TV), not the state (live or prerecorded).

  • So can I ask this in both ways? "Is this online class going to be live?" And "is this online class going to be on live?" @user3169 – Maimai123 Feb 16 '16 at 1:18
  • As I said, the second one needs to have a medium (where it is "on") specified. Without that, it sounds odd to me, though technically it could be implied and not stated, I suppose. – user3169 Feb 16 '16 at 4:48
0

I think the word/construction you're looking for is live, without preposition.

  • You can say "it's live!" referred to a party with the meaning of:

    jumping, full of people, exciting. [Referred to] something that was very enjoyable:
    That rave was live 
    The place was live
    (Urban Dictionary)

  • you can use the word live as an adverb, meaning:

    broadcast as it ​happens; ​performing or being ​performed in ​front of an ​audience: I've got two ​tickets to ​see them (​perform) live.
    (Cambridge Dictionary)

    Or are you referring to the service named OnLive (which has a different purpose, though)?

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