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Which one is/are the correct form(s)

  • my car's yellow matches the jacket's

  • my car's yellow matches the jacket's one

  • my car's yellow matches the jacket's yellow

The sentence is supposed to mean "my car's yellow is the same as the jacket's yellow."

I feel like the first sentence should work but I'm not quite sure. Which one is/are correct? If several of them are correct, which one is the most 'elegant'?

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Your third sentence is most correct

my car's yellow matches the jacket's yellow

and has good parallel construction.

The phrasing of you first example is usually

my car's yellow matches the jacket
my car's yellow matches my jacket

the yellow matches something

The possessive is not usually used for the second object, and it is understood the colour is what is being discussed

If your jacket is only partly yellow, you can use your first sentence

My car's yellow matches my jacket's (stripe)
My car's yellow matches my jacket

as you point to the yellow stripe since stripe would be implied, or you can specify

My car's yellow matches my jacket's stripes

if the jacket is not visible. The same sounding sentence

My car's yellow matches the jackets

would mean there are multiple jackets that match your car and the listener may be left confused from the ambiguity.

  • Thank you a lot! Would you still go with "my car's yellow matches the jacket" if the jacket had several colors and yellow was only one of them? Or would you then definitely go with "my car's yellow matches the jacket'". I still want to say that the yellow is the same. And finally: is the possessive just 'usually' not used on the second object or is it just plain wrong? – dingalapadum Feb 16 '16 at 9:43

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