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Suppose that I want to explain why we select the students using specific metrics. I've written down:

  1. if we choose the students indiscriminately, the fairness goes under the question.

  2. if we choose the students indiscriminately, the fairness is questionable.

  3. Selecting the students indiscriminately makes the fairness questionable.


Question: Would you please provide me with better sentences and phrases?


Personally, I prefer to use phrases similar to "go + under + question". Such phrases are very common in my native language (Persian). Also, for me, It is interesting to see whether English-spoken people use such phrases or not.

Thanks in advance.

  • Personally, I have never heard of "something goes under question" said in a sentence. And "indiscriminately" is used with negative statements such as "he killed indiscriminately". You might want to say "If we choose the students randomly, it throws fairness into question." Though I still don't understand what you exactly mean by that. – Ghaith Alrestom Feb 21 '16 at 10:08
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Selecting the students indiscriminately makes fairness questionable.
Selecting the students indiscriminately makes the fairness of it (all) questionable.

is correct meaning the selection process has flaws and questions.

If we choose the students indiscriminately, then fairness becomes a question.
if we choose the students indiscriminately, fairness may becomes a question.
If we choose the students indiscriminately, fairness may become questionable.

might be a better phrasing for the hypothetical outcome.

The strange part about your statement is that choosing students indiscriminately (without discrimination) is the same as at random which can be deemed as fair. The problem is usually when there is some type of discrimination involved.

If we are not careful with our selection metrics, they may be questioned for discrimination.

To go under question is more a legal term for questioning a suspected criminal

he was put under question at the police station

and would not really apply to something inanimate like a selection process.

  • Thanks for the answer, what about the make + questionable ? regardless of "random" or "indiscriminately" – Cardinal Feb 21 '16 at 14:20
  • I've added more examples in my answer – Peter Feb 21 '16 at 14:31

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