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I am not watching the movie on TV. I am not watching the movie on my laptop.

Should I use either-or or neither-nor?

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  • I'm not watching the movie on TV nor on my laptop.
    – Schwale
    Feb 24, 2016 at 1:18
  • Both can be used. Just remember to keep the word 'not' while using either-or and omit the word 'not' if you use neither-nor May 24, 2016 at 6:43

2 Answers 2

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You can use both.

I am not watching the movie on TV. I am not watching the movie on my laptop either.

"Either" is used in the same meaning as "too" in the negative statements.

I am watching the movie neither on TV nor on my laptop.

This is used to unite two negative ideas.You can also use

I am not watching the movie on TV or on my laptop

For emphasis you can use "nor" after a pause.

I am not watching the movie on TV, nor on my laptop.

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  • The OP wasn't asking about using 'either' alone. He was very specific about using 'either-or'. The rest is fine though.
    – Varun Nair
    May 24, 2016 at 5:55
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In this context, as Monica Sendi Afa said, you need to keep the 'not' in the sentence when using 'either-or', but you need to remove the 'not' from the sentence when using 'neither-nor'. Having said that,

In the case of using 'either-or', your example sentence will be

"I am not watching the movie either on TV or on my laptop."

In the case of using 'neither-nor", your example sentence will be

"I am watching the movie neither on TV nor on my laptop."

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