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"We wondered who Dumbledore had trusted enough to help him, apart from you."

(Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone)

Is there no need to put subject of to help, for example, for them? Is the fore-shifted who is the semantic subject of to help?

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    You got it. Dumbledore trusted X to help him, and we wondered who X was. – StoneyB on hiatus Jul 22 '13 at 12:02
  • Infinitives don't have a subject. – kiamlaluno Jul 22 '13 at 12:12
  • @kiamlaluno Sure they do. I urge you to consider this sentence. Dumbledore trusted somebody to help him. The subject may serve other functions as well, but it's still the subject of the infinitive. – StoneyB on hiatus Jul 22 '13 at 13:07
  • @StoneyB It's not You to consider this sentence. I is the subject for urge, not to consider. – kiamlaluno Jul 22 '13 at 14:15
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    @BobRodes 1) I don't mean to imply that all infinitives have subjects; to do so would be an error. 2) A single constituent may serve two functions. In your sentence, the subject of learn is also the subject of conduct, "I"; in Dumbledore trusted somebody to help him, the object of trust is also the subject of help. See this. – StoneyB on hiatus Aug 5 '13 at 8:17
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               [Dumbledore had trusted X enough to help him].
Who was X?                             ↓
              ← ← ← ← ← ← ← ← ← ← ← ← ↵
             ↓
           [who Dumbledore had trusted _ enough to help him]
We wondered who Dumbledore had trusted   enough to help him.

Note that Dumbledore trusted X enough to help him is ambiguous. It may mean either:

Dumbledore had sufficient trust in X [for Dumbledore to help X] OR
Dumbledore had sufficient trust in X [that X would help Dumbledore].

But context makes clear what is meant.

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