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I'd do anything for you to repay my debt, other than killing people.

I'd do anything for you to repay my debt, other than kill people.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? Is the first more appropriate than the second one?

1 Answer 1

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1. I'd do anything for you to repay my debt, other than killing people.

2. I'd do anything for you to repay my debt, other than kill people.

Both the sentences above are correct. The phrase other than here acts in both the sentences like a preposition.

In sentence #1, like other preposition it takes a Gerund-Participle.

I look forward to playing golf with you.

I feel completely fine after sleeping a full night's sleep.

I'd do anything for you to repay my debt, other than killing people.

But sentence #2 is a bit different. The phrase other than still works like a preposition there, but the complement it takes in not anything similar to the one a preposition normally licenses. But here the complement it takes is called Matrix-licensed-complement. Some other preposition can license similar complements, for example - except.

There is nothing any of us can do except be cautious. [We can be cautious]

I'd do anything for you to repay my debt other than kill people. [I can't kill people]

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  • Do both the sentences I used as examples mean the same? Feb 27, 2016 at 19:15
  • @lekonchekon Yes they do. Feb 28, 2016 at 15:08

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