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Good evening, everyone. My question refers to a sentence from my exercise in English:

Some drivers may notice extra vibration. They should bring the car to a dealer for service.

The command of this task sounds in a following way: Join this pair of sentences into a single sentence. Use that/which and a relative clause, or a present participial phrase. Include modal verbs printed in italics (in this case the word should). My doubts concern the doer. It is some drivers and, as a result, it is for me hard to join the pair of sentences so as not to change the first sentence. If the subject was extra vibration, the task would be easier.

How should I join this pair of sentences into one sentence, avoiding transforming the first one?

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  • What exactly is your question?
    – Jacob
    Feb 27 '16 at 21:36
  • Good question. I forgot asking a question :). How should I join this pair of sentences into one sentence, avoiding transformating the first one? Joining by the word "shoulding" would be probably grammatical incorrect. Am i right?
    – Paweł
    Feb 27 '16 at 21:38
  • By any chance do you have an example or a model for this exercise (that shows an original sentence and the modified one)? It is hard to tell what exactly the directions want you to do.
    – Jacob
    Feb 27 '16 at 21:41
  • Yes, I have it. You're right, it can significantly simplify the problem. An example looks like this way: "The company issued a press release last week. This covers vehicles from the 2008-2010 range." -> "The company issued a press release last week, covering vehicles from the 2008-2010 range." And the next one: "The manufacturer stated that there were flaws in the engine valve springs. These could make the vehicle stall." -> "The manufacturer stated that there were flaws in the engine valve springs, which could make the vehicle stall."
    – Paweł
    Feb 27 '16 at 21:47
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    So, if you are still struggling, maybe this could be an answer: "Some drivers may notice extra vibration, in which case they should bring the car to a dealer for service," however this doesn't seem to follow the models exactly.
    – Jacob
    Feb 27 '16 at 21:48
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(I posted this in the comments and it seems like it answered OP's question.)

One solution could be:

Some drivers may notice extra vibration, in which case they should bring the car to a dealer for service.

This works fine, however it doesn't seem to follow the models you provided exactly. It uses a relative clause, yes, but with a prepositional construct, which doesn't appear in either of the models.

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