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For me, both next sentences are correct :

  • I don't want you to go to Ireland.
  • I don't want that you go to Ireland.

How do I know whether or not I should use "that" in a sentences like these?

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    In the case of the verb "to want," we never use the relative pronoun "that," unlike in the Spanish language, for example.
    – Jacob
    Feb 28, 2016 at 15:09

1 Answer 1

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Some verbs, can be followed by that clauses, some cannot.

  • I don't want you to go to Ireland.
    I don't want that you go to Ireland. (want is not used with a that clause.)

There's no easy way to decide if a verb is followed by a that clause or not. Mostly, you'll have to learn them as part of a phrase.

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    That's right. You just have to learn that (for example) "want" takes an infinitive clause with 'to' (I want him to go.); but "desire" can take an infinitive clause with "to" or a finite clause introduced by "that" (I desire him to go. I desire that he goes (or that he go - so-called 'subjunctive')), and "wish" can take an infinitive clause with "to" or a finite conditional clause optionally introduced by "that": ( I wish him to go. I wish [that] he would go.)
    – Colin Fine
    Feb 28, 2016 at 16:47

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