2

Consider the following sentence:

This allows convenient writing of queries in JavaScript template strings
(that is itself delimited with backticks).

"is" refers to "template strings", but "strings" is plural and it should therefore be "are" instead of "is".

"that are" feels awkward to me however and I would change it to "which are" - I guess both are acceptable in this context?

I wonder what to do with the "itself". Can it be used for multiple "it"s?
Should it be "... which are themselve ..." ? Or is "themselve" only used for people (he/she)?

2

This allows for convenient writing of queries in JavaScript template strings (which are delimited with backticks themselves).

or

This allows for convenient writing of queries in JavaScript template strings (which are also delimited with backticks).

Both of these options make sense, but that is assuming that the reader has enough context to determine that "which" refers to the template strings and not the queries. If you want to avoid any possibility of misconfusion, you could always just say:

This allows for convenient writing of queries in JavaScript template strings. Template strings are delimited with backticks.

  • Thanks for spotting the missing for. I went with your first suggestion. – CoDEmanX Mar 3 '16 at 21:50
0

If you want to keep itself in the phrase, you could write:

(that are in themselves delimited with backticks)

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