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Is it grammatical to use the expression "I have also attached ..." in an email?

For example:

"I have also attached the screenshot of the faculty list at University which I was on."

Should I use a comma before the word "which"?

migrated from english.stackexchange.com Mar 3 '16 at 2:56

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    It's not the prepositional ending which is clunky. That's often objected to but not incorrect (and often is more clear). The problem is that it's unclear what "which" applies to — were you on the faculty list, or the screenshot, or the university? Since "list" is the only thing to which the preposition "on" normally applies, we can understand it just fine, but it still feels awkward. I'd move it — "I've also attached a screenshot of the faculty list which I was on at University." – mattdm Apr 2 '16 at 15:44
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"I have also attached the screenshot of the faculty list at University which I was on."

It took me a while to figure out the meaning of the sentence (maybe because of prejudice, expecting badly mangled English, but maybe because it is unusual). I think it would be much clearer if you said

"I have also attached the screenshot of the faculty list at University, which contains my name and photo."

Or I misunderstood the sentence completely and you would write something like

"I have also attached the screenshot of the faculty list at University, where I studied philosophy for two years."

"which I was on" is so unspecific that it's hard to figure out what it refers to.

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Yes, you can use the expression “I have also attached…” in your email. Most prefer the abbr. PFA (Please find attached). There's no harm in using it.

Besides, some mail applications validate the mail before sending and notify you if you have used the word 'attached' but not attached anything.

  • I believe that there is a place/field/industry that uses "PFA" - possibly many. I am a native English speaker who has never seen it before, though. The new English speaker would be wise to hold off on using that acronym until he or she has observed other people in their sphere using it. – Adam May 2 '16 at 15:01
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Question 1:

It is grammatical to use in an email and just tells the recipient what you have attached to the email. I would prefer "Enclosure:" for a more formal email though.

Question 2:

You do not need to put a comma before "which" because it is one of those "necessary" phrases that is not a "sidenote".

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