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This question already has an answer here:

I received a call which was for my colleague. he was not at his seat at that time hence I told caller I will inform him about his call once he returned to his seat.

How should I inform to my colleague?

Xyz had called you, Please call him

Or

Xyz called you, Please call him

I know there is one more way to say this

Xyz's call for you Please call him

According to me simple past is enough here because I want to refer only one past event.

Please help

marked as duplicate by Alan Carmack, Chenmunka, Usernew, ColleenV, Brian Tompsett - 汤莱恩 Jun 8 '16 at 16:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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Of your examples, 1) and 3) are incorrect. 1) would be ok if you changed it to

Xyz has called you: please call him.

... but 2) is the best.

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Your second example is closest. I would say:

Xyz called you, please call him back.

or

Xyz called you, please return his call.

Simple present is correct in this example, since Xyz's call is now entirely in the past.

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Idiomatic would be

You received a call from XYZ.

or

XYZ phoned while you were away from your desk.

P.S. When explaining the situation to us, you should say

I told the caller I would inform him once he returned to his seat.

When explaining to us what you said, you are not directly quoting yourself ("will" is what you actually said) but reporting indirectly what you said, and so we backshift will to would to reflect that nuance.

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