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Is the usage of "and till" appropriate?

Personally I think it's not correct since "till" is a conjunction and should not be preceded by "and". But I noticed such usage in many examples in many circumstances.

In those days, and till comparatively recent time, the country was densely wooded

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    I don't think "until/till" or whatever is even acting as a conjunction in your example sentence. – Nihilist_Frost Mar 11 '16 at 3:53
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    There's nothing wrong with the use of 'and tilll"; till is a preposition in the sentence. – Khan Mar 11 '16 at 7:20
  • I’d avoid it entirely & use ‘and until’ instead. It just sounds forced, to my ear. – gone fishin' again. Nov 3 '17 at 15:44
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In this example, till is a contraction or alternate form of until, which in this case is a preposition. See sense 3 of the definition here:

  1. (often preceded by up) in or throughout the period before ⇒ he waited until six
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Note that till in your sentence is a preposition, not a conjunction. Nevertheless, to address you broader concern: Sometimes conjunctions can be preceded by and.

And so (that) he could get a better job, he graduated from high school.

And now that he graduated he started to work.

He liked his professors, the staff, the girls he banged. And yet he hated his roommate.

He didn't know how fortunate he was and till he found out he was miserable.

For until (which till is a variant of) as both a preposition and conjunction, see Oxford dictionary.

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Until is both a preposition and conjunction. And 'til X is OK if X is a noun or noun phrase.


It's common in speech to omit the un- part of until when speaking quickly or informally.

This is most correctly spelled in writing as 'til, or til which prevents confusion with till (meaning a garden tool or part of a cash register).

It's not common in educated or formal writing to contract this word. You should avoid doing so unless you're writing a fiction book and expressing such speech or in an informal situation.

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