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I'm reading a book now, but since it was written in English by Russian woman, I'm not sure about the level of the English of this book. Let me cite to you one phrase:

"The word histology has offered the German scientist P. Mayer in 1819. The general histology study basic tissues in human body"

I wonder if it should not be as follow (my correction / version in bold):

"The word histology has offered by the German scientist P. Mayer in 1819. The general histology study basic tissues in human body"

The second thing is about the word "study" in this phrase. Is it considered as a verb? if it is, then it should be "studies" (because it refers to "general histology"). and if it is not, then it is not clear sentence ("The general histology study basic tissues in human body")

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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it asks questions about a poor foreign language to English translation.
    – user3169
    Mar 13, 2016 at 22:19
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    While it's obvious to us that it's a poor translation, it isn't to a learner. I don't think that you should have to know the answer to a question to determine whether it is off-topic. Typos are one thing, but poor translations have mistakes that learners from certain types of languages are inclined to make, and I think questions about those mistakes are useful here.
    – ColleenV
    Mar 14, 2016 at 12:55

2 Answers 2

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The active voice "has offered" makes Mayer the offering. The verb to offer doesn't license the preposition by in the active voice. Likely the intent of the first sentence is

The word histology was offered by the German scientist P. [sic] Mayer in 1819.

Offered isn't quite the right word; suggested or coined are better.

General histology is a single field of study, so it needs a verb matching in number. It also doesn't take an article:

General histology studies basic tissues in human body.

This is a slightly-odd metaphor as histology doesn't study things; those who practice histology do. Better:

General histology is the study of basic tissues in human body.

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The word "histology" was given to us by the German scientist A. Mayer in 1819.

It was A. Mayer. The language is rather garbled.

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