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There's been a murder in the scaffolding nearby my apartment.

There's been a murder in the scaffolding near my apartment.

Are both of them grammatically correct? Do they mean the same?

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When you are using it as an adverb, 'nearby' is okay.

The clubhouse is nearby

But in your examples, you need a preposition and thus, 'near' looks natural.

There has been a murder in the scaffolding nearby near my apartment.

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Nearby is an adjective, near is an adverb or preposition. You can use both, but the structure would be different.

Prepositional use:

There has been a murder in the scaffolding near my apartment.

Adjectival use:

There has been a murder in the nearby scaffolding

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