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Is there any difference in meaning between "paper review" and "review of paper"?

what difference does it make when we add of between two noun?

Example 1: I want to send my paper to someone for a review, in email subject should it be "paper review" or "review of paper"?

Example 2: When I give the name of a particular book to someone, should I say, here is "the name of the book" that I promised, or here is "the book name" that I promised?

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    Can you give us the context in which these phrases were used? It might help to understand what is meant by each. Without any context, I would say they probably mean similar things, but it's hard to say for sure, because it depends too much on the particular case - for example, "horse race" is a common phrase which means "a race of horses" but it's very rare to see "a race of horses" used, and "brickbat" has a well-known meaning, but "bat of brick" doesn't make any sense. – stangdon Mar 16 '16 at 12:45
  • example 1: I want to send my paper to someone for a review, in email subject should it be "paper review" or "review of paper"? example 2: when I give the name of a particular book to someone, should I say, here is "the name of the book" that I promised, or here is "the book name" that I promised – Eli Mar 16 '16 at 14:31
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Your examples

paper review
review of paper

needs a qualifier to have the meaning you intend.

Paper review might mean a critique written in a newspaper or a display of different types of paper. The phrase is not used to mean the critique of written material in the way art review means critique of art works.

A review of paper might mean a scholarly article on different types of paper.

research paper review
review of my paper

might be closer to what you are intending.

When you send your paper to be looked at by somebody, you might write

Attached is my paper for ( your ) review.

Thank you for your review of my paper.

For naming your book

As promised, here is the name of my book...
The name of my book is...
The book's name is...

  • Thank you! what I meant was "research paper". So, according to your explanation, there is no difference between paper review and review of paper, when the intention is focused on the "reviewing action" ? Also, saying "book name", instead of "book's name" is not proper? – Eli Mar 16 '16 at 14:22
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    No... he's saying that "review of paper" is not something you should say at all. For the context you added in comments on the original question, the appropriate subject for an e-mail would be "Research Paper Review." I can't think of any context other than "research paper" where you'd refer to something as "_____ paper". You could talk about a book, novel, story, poem, or any number of other written documents, but only "research papers" are referred to as "papers" in that manner. – T.J.L. Mar 16 '16 at 14:28
  • You would use book's name because it is the name of the book. Book name wouldn't really mean anything in your context. – Peter Mar 16 '16 at 14:31
  • @T.J.L. Thank you! but my question was to understand the difference that "of" would make in the meaning, when it comes between two noun? another example: difference between "here is the meeting time" and "here is the time of meeting"? – Eli Mar 16 '16 at 14:40
  • @Eli Your new example is not something a native speaker would say either. You could say "Eight AM is the time of the meeting", but it's cumbersome and awkward. "The meeting is at eight AM" is more appropriate. You'd only say "Here is the meeting time" if you were handing somebody something with the time written on it. – T.J.L. Mar 16 '16 at 14:47

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