0

"My uncle sent in a picture. And in that picture my little cousin had marked his calendar, that said sports day." My English is not good. And I'm afraid to make mistakes. People would laugh at me. :/

  • I'm sure nobody will laugh at you for making mistakes; we were all learners once. I would likely write that as "My uncle sent me a picture; it was of my little cousin marking 'sports day' in his calendar." – John Clifford Mar 16 '16 at 12:59
  • or 'My uncle sent me a picture in which my little cousin was marking 'sports day' in his calendar' – MAKZ Mar 16 '16 at 13:26
  • His question does not have the cousin marking it at that moment, just of the calendar with the markings. – White Fang Mar 16 '16 at 13:44
  • @Ardis Accept my answer if that helps you by clicking on the hollow tick next to the answer. Your question history shows you never accepted any answer in any of your questions, which is no good for the community – Sнаđошƒаӽ Apr 17 '16 at 18:40
1

You could use this:

"My uncle sent me a picture of my little cousin's calendar where my cousin had marked the sports day."

This I think makes the meaning very clear.

You could also use "...where he marked the sports day", but this would create a little confusion as to who actually marked, your uncle, or your cousin.


A little astray this, but this Chinese proverb should help you :-)

"He who asks a question is a fool for five minutes; he who does not ask a question remains a fool forever."

So, happy questioning!!!

0

"My uncle sent me a picture of my little cousin's calendar, which he had marked 'sports day' on."

Don't be afraid to make mistakes, if you're learning, no one will laugh at you. Everybody was there once.

0

Here's how to get from your sentences to a single sentence:

"My uncle sent in a picture. And in that picture my little cousin had marked his calendar, that said sports day."

The word picture appears in both sentences, so you can use a pronoun in the second sentence. Relative pronouns are used to combine two sentences, in this case the word which is your best choice, since a picture is a thing, not a person. Using which allows you to get rid of and as well.

That gives you the following sentence:

My uncle sent in a picture in which my little cousin had marked his calendar, that said sports day.

You can condense the sentence even more when you look at the verb mark (definition 2b for the verb). You can mark a note about something on or in somewhere used to keep notes, like a notepad or calendar. Therefore, you can make sports day the direct object of mark, and follow the direct object with the place where.

That gives you the following sentence:

My uncle sent in a picture in which my little cousin had marked sports day on his calendar.

You can make it even better if you change "My uncle sent in" so it says who received it. "My uncle sent me" or "My uncle sent my father," for instance.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.