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To understand the ancient Mayan people who lived in the area that is today southern Mexico and Central America and the ecological difficulties they faced, one must first consider their environment, which we think of as "jungle" or "tropical rainforest." This view is inaccurate, and the reason proves to be important.Properly speaking, tropical rainforests grow in high-rainfall equatorial areas that remain wet or humid all year round. But the Maya homeland lies more than sixteen hundred kilometers from the equator, at latitudes 17 to 22 degrees north, in a habitat termed a "seasonal tropical forest." That is, while there does tend to be a rainy season from May to October, there is also a dry season from January through April. If one focuses on the wet months, one calls the Maya homeland a "seasonal tropical forest"; if one focuses on the dry months, one could instead describe it as a "seasonal desert."

closed as off-topic by ColleenV, Nathan Tuggy, user3169, M.A.R., choster Mar 17 '16 at 19:39

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  • "This question should include more details than have been provided here. Please edit to add the research you have done in your efforts to answer the question, or provide more context. See: Details, Please." – ColleenV, Nathan Tuggy, M.A.R.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    Please provide a link to the source, if you are quoting material. – Alan Carmack Mar 17 '16 at 12:35
  • 1
    Also, what exactly gives you trouble about the part of the passage you have bolded? Right now we can only guess. – Alan Carmack Mar 17 '16 at 12:39
  • I cannot understand the bolded sentence.why after "verb" we have "to be" and whats the intention of the author when he/she says bolded sentence? – Anfi Mar 18 '16 at 15:35
  • Simply speaking, it means that the reason the view is inaccurate is important. – Alan Carmack Aug 5 '16 at 7:36
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Okay, this is quite tricky. But I'll give it a shot. I could do with a little more context, but I'll try to interpret with what I have.

Please note:
I'm not sure about the validity of this context nor do I know much about the Mayans and the environment they lived in. But, I'll try to help you with what the author meant, irrespective of what he thinks about the actual topic.

Let's look into the following sentence:

"This view is inaccurate, and the reason proves to be important."

To answer this, I'll attempt to answer two questions first.

  • What is the author referring to as "this view"?
  • What are these "reasons" he's talking about?

The view

To understand the ancient Mayan people who lived in the area that is today southern Mexico and Central America and the ecological difficulties they faced, one must first consider their environment, which we think of as "jungle" or "tropical rainforest.

Meaning : To know more about the Mayans who lived in that area and to understand what all difficulties they faced during their times, one should look into their living conditions and their environment. Now, the statement suggests that the environment comprised of dense forests and jungles. The author, here, suggests that this idea, or this view is totally incorrect. This can mean either of the two following things:

1) To know more about the Mayans, we don't have to consider the environment they were living in.

or

2) Their environment wasn't comprised of forests and jungles.

The Reasons

Now, this must be something that follows this paragraph from the context. According to what I understood, the author would've mentioned the reasons soon after this paragraph. If the author has provided "the reasons" behind his claim, this line could be interpreted as:

This view is inaccurate, and the reason proves to be important. And the reasons are......(the reasons should be given here).

  • It could be that the difficulty of the sentence hinges on the usage and meaning of proves. – Alan Carmack Mar 17 '16 at 12:37
  • Yes, as I mentioned, we need a little more context. As of now, assumptions are the best bet. Once more context is given, I can edit. If my answer conflicts with the meaning then, I'll delete this post – Varun Nair Mar 17 '16 at 12:47
  • Thank you both,I am english learner and this is a passage for practicing reading,here is the rest of the first paragraph: – Anfi Mar 17 '16 at 12:58
  • Properly speaking, tropical rainforests grow in high-rainfall equatorial areas that remain wet or humid all year round. But the Maya homeland lies more than sixteen hundred kilometers from the equator, at latitudes 17 to 22 degrees north, in a habitat termed a "seasonal tropical forest." That is, while there does tend to be a rainy season from May to October, there is also a dry season from January through April. If one focuses on the wet months, one calls the Maya homeland a "seasonal tropical forest"; if one focuses on the dry months, one could instead describe it as a "seasonal desert." – Anfi Mar 17 '16 at 13:01
  • Oh, okay. See, this is what I wasn't sure about. That's why I didn't add it to my answer earlier. Thanks for the info. Cheers – Varun Nair Mar 17 '16 at 13:03

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