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I am sure that this is grammatically correct, but can you say a phrase like "... that Harold be king." Apparently you HAVE to use "should be", and that works, but does just 'be' work?

The context which was in the PowerPoint was "X and X supported that Harold be King", meaning they both believed that he should have the throne.

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    Yes. The use of be here is subjunctive. – Drew Mar 6 '16 at 23:10
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Let's start by saying that "I support the fact that..." is almost always bad, not grammatically but logically. Facts don't need support. They just are.

"I support that Harold is king" implies that Harold is at least claiming to be king currently, and you support him in that status, against people who want to change that or think he is not legitimately king. "I support that Harold be king" implies that you support him being king in the future. He may or may not be king now.

  • Well, the context which was in the PowerPoint was "X and X supported that Harold be King", meaning they both believed that he should have the throne. – Christos Mar 6 '16 at 23:20
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No. You can use the subjunctive to say "I support the hope/desire that Harold be king", using the subjunctive: or you can, more naturally, say "I support the opinion that Harold should be king": but if you use the term fact then you cannot use the subjunctive, and your support or otherwise is irrelevant.

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    I don't agree. 'I share the desire that Harold be king.' but 'I share the belief that Harold is king.' The 'subjunctive' would be infelicitous here; you'd need 'I share the belief that Harold should be king.' – Edwin Ashworth Mar 6 '16 at 23:38
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    @Edwin Fair point, now edited. – TimLymington Mar 7 '16 at 9:52

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