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I want to write that though something seems to be a nonsense at first sight, it is generally not nonsense and means something. The first way to express my thoughts which came to my mind was something like: "Seemingly nonsense, it still does make sense if we consider it more closely". Could you please comment on my attempt to write a grammatically correct sentence? And is it better to use "seeming" instead of "seemingly"?

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    You have already used "at first sight" in your description: that fits quite well. "At first sight it seems nonsense, but it makes sense if we [consider it more closely / examine it in more detail]" – JavaLatte Mar 20 '16 at 17:00
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“*Seeming nonsense …” doesn't work. Seeming acts as an adjective but there's nothing for it to be a complement of. “Seemingly …” could work as a complement of the whole rest of the sentence, but “Seemingly nonsense” doesn't quite fit. Anther problem with the sentence is that the first part is in opposition to the second part, but there's nothing to indicate that grammatically.

The following sentences are all correct, but the first two are a bit stiff. The third and fourth sentences sound more natural.

While seemingly nonsense, this text does make sense if we look at it closely.
While seemingly nonsensical, this text does make sense if we look at it closely.
While it seems to be nonsense, this text does make sense if we look at it closely.
While it looks like nonsense at first sight, this text does make sense if we look at it closely.

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I would write:

I thought it was nonsense, but upon further consideration I would like to consider it more closely.

If you really want to use to seem, I would use:

It seemed to be nonsense to me, but upon further consideration I would like to consider it more closely.

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