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situation 1

A: What is this photo about?
B: This is the situation that he told me something.

situation 2

A: What is this photo about?
B: This is that he told me something.

Can I substitute situation A with situation B?

If I can't, what is the difference between two sentences.

  • 1
    It's a little bit hard to give a definite answer, because neither sentence is grammatically correct. I think what you want is something like "This is the situation that he told me about." – stangdon Mar 21 '16 at 12:11
  • If stangdon is right about the first sentence, the second would be "This is what he told me about". – JavaLatte Mar 21 '16 at 12:15
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    btw, it's a bit confusing using letters for both the situations and the speakers. Your question might be clearer if you used numbers for the situations and letters for the speakers, – JavaLatte Mar 21 '16 at 12:16
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For either sentence, use where instead of that.

A: What is this photo about?

B: This is the situation where he told me something.

A: What is this photo about?

B: This is where he told me something.

You can substitute the second sentence for the first.

Where here is a relative pronoun. The second clause is "restrictive" (e.g. define/adds essential information to the first clause) and therefore you want to use a word other than that, such as which, etc.

While where is normally is used for location, it can also be used to refer to a "time or occasion." Read this ELU answer for details.

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