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situation 1

A: What is this photo about?
B: This is the situation that he told me something.

situation 2

A: What is this photo about?
B: This is that he told me something.

Can I substitute situation A with situation B?

If I can't, what is the difference between two sentences.

closed as unclear what you're asking by shin, Glorfindel, JavaLatte, StoneyB, M.A.R. Feb 27 '17 at 14:29

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    It's a little bit hard to give a definite answer, because neither sentence is grammatically correct. I think what you want is something like "This is the situation that he told me about." – stangdon Mar 21 '16 at 12:11
  • If stangdon is right about the first sentence, the second would be "This is what he told me about". – JavaLatte Mar 21 '16 at 12:15
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    btw, it's a bit confusing using letters for both the situations and the speakers. Your question might be clearer if you used numbers for the situations and letters for the speakers, – JavaLatte Mar 21 '16 at 12:16
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For either sentence, use where instead of that.

A: What is this photo about?

B: This is the situation where he told me something.

A: What is this photo about?

B: This is where he told me something.

You can substitute the second sentence for the first.

Where here is a relative pronoun. The second clause is "restrictive" (e.g. define/adds essential information to the first clause) and therefore you want to use a word other than that, such as which, etc.

While where is normally is used for location, it can also be used to refer to a "time or occasion." Read this ELU answer for details.

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