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I'll be helpful for any educational website. I really want to speak properly.

  1. I'd like to learn, what is the rule for using adverb

    certainly

    in a sentence like these:

    Today's the day you have been waiting for.


  1. Also, what's the correct placement of "not" in:

    Maybe I can do this, to not use / not to use ticket also for metro?

Thank you very much.

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    In my opinion, this question is better split into two questions. The two grammar topitcs are not quite the same. – Damkerng T. Mar 22 '16 at 15:01
  • Definitely, it's better to split these two. – Olha Horak Mar 22 '16 at 15:10
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Thee first two possibilities mean that the speaker is confident that the statement "today is the day that you have been waiting for" is correct.

Certainly, today's the day you have been waiting for.

Today's the day you have been waiting for, certainly.

The next sentences emphasises today, ie this is a very important day for you.

Today's certainly the day you have been waiting for.

The next sentence emphasises the waiting, suggesting that (somehow) you have put a lot of effort or enthusiasm into the waiting.

Today's the day you certainly have been waiting for.

The next is called a split infinitive: putting the adverb between the auxiliary verbs (have and been) and the participle (waiting). Some people think that split infinitives are wrong. Again, the emphasis is on the waiting, but the meaning of certainly changes- see the next example.

Today's the day you have been certainly waiting for.

The final possibility transfers the certainty from the speaker to the listener, who has been, for example, waiting for the results of an exam, confident that they have done well. You could in fact substitute confidently to make it absolutely clear.

Today's the day you have been waiting certainly for.

I am not quite sure what you mean by the second example, but it looks like an "Is a split infinitive OK?" question: have a look at the link I gave you earlier.

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Your placement of certainly will depend on what you want to emphasize according to The Law of Proximity[1]:

Certainly, today's the day you have been waiting for.
emphasis on today

Today's the day you certainly have been waiting for.
Today's the day you have certainly been waiting for.
Today's the day you have been waiting for, certainly.
emphasis on waiting for

In your second example, your original question is awkward and maybe should be

Maybe I can also use this ticket for the metro?

in which case the negation would be

Maybe I can not use this ticket for the metro?

The not goes with can since the question is about ability to do something not the doing of something. You also would not want to place not between to and use since it would give you a split infinitive.

[1] The Law of Proximity is not a real law, but is understood my many to be how close something is to something else.

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  • Many a grammarians threw a fit when hearing the StarTrek intro "to boldly go..." – Benito Ciaro Jun 20 '16 at 21:13

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