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I know that em-dashes can be used to surround parenthetical statements, but other than doing it the usual way—surrounding extra content in two em-dashes—it is allowed to surround them with a total of three, two at both ends, and one in the middle?

For example, I know that instead of using an em-dash in the middle, you can use a comma instead. However, would the following example be correct (just something I thought of off the top of my head, so some phrasing may be a bit incongruous):

Although your grades do not represent everything and you can indeed find a successful career without even going to post-secondary education—quite an expensive choice, by the way—not a common path to take—I recommend you study hard and aim to enter a post-secondary institution if possible.

Both of the phrases surrounded by em-dashes can be excluded, but would the consecutive use of em-dashes like that be correct, and/or advised?

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    The use of two interrupters in a row is unconventional. Putting an interrupter within one of the interrupters is highly unconventional, putting the whole lot inside a 35-word sentence is... is... is it really necessary?
    – JavaLatte
    Mar 23 '16 at 14:14
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    Em-dashes are normally used in pairs to replace parentheses, except around a clause at the end of a sentence, where the second em-dash can be omitted. Em-dashes can also be used singly in place of a semi-colon: that is not possible in this sentence, because you begin the sentence with a conjunction and the associated main clause is at the end of the sentence. thepunctuationguide.com/em-dash.html
    – JavaLatte
    Mar 23 '16 at 14:30
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I saw some authors that do these kind of things. It seems like a deliberate effort to build long and complex sentences, to create a certain style. If you want to go that way, there are precedences...

However, if you write in order to be understood, I would advise replacing the outer dashes with parentheses. You can then leave the inner dash as a separator. I would also add a comma to separate the second clause. In summary...

Although your grades do not represent everything and you can indeed find a successful career without even going to post-secondary education (quite an expensive choice, by the way — not a common path to take), I recommend you study hard and aim to enter a post-secondary institution if possible.

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