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I need to run this sentence by y'all.

The candidate stood out in aspects like class participation and interaction with classmates.

I have never read "stand out" being used in that way. Can you say that someone stands out in certain activities?

Am I right in my suspicion? If I am, what would be a good alternative?

  • This usage is common. See stand out "2. To be conspicuous, distinctive, or prominent." – user3169 Mar 25 '16 at 4:32
  • Yes, but have you ever read a sentence like "He stands out in a certain activity? – asef Mar 25 '16 at 4:46
  • If the candidate can stand out in a crowd, s/he can stand out in other aspects as well! – Maulik V Mar 25 '16 at 6:17
  • They're hardly the same thing. A crowd is the group of people in which she stands as different. An aspect, on the other hand, is a field. I may be wrong, though. – asef Mar 25 '16 at 6:30
  • From COCA: This portable, at-home simulator stands out in three ways: It's fun (tee it up on digital versions of Torrey Pines, Kiawah and the Old Course). It's useful (instant swing analysis of clubhead speed, face angle, path and tempo). And it's simple to useall you need is a computer, your clubs, and high ceilings. – Maulik V Mar 25 '16 at 7:37
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This statement seems awkward. I would phrase it instead as:

The candidate stood out in certain aspects, like class participation and interaction with classmates.

although that still sounds a bit mawkish to my ear. I might instead just say:

The candidate stood out in class participation and interaction with classmates.

which employs more direct language.

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