1

What does this sentence mean?

They would likely be interested in what you've put together here!

When I should use this?

5
  • It isn't a complete sentence, so it's hard to say exactly what it means. Can you give us more context? Where did you see this?
    – stangdon
    Mar 25 '16 at 13:44
  • "They would likely be interested in what you've put together here!"
    – Anggie
    Mar 25 '16 at 14:16
  • 'Put together' means 'to construct or create' as in 'put together a new bookcase'. Your sentence probably means, "I think the chances that they like what you've created here are rather high".
    – Yuri
    Mar 25 '16 at 15:18
  • Using "here" at the end of the sentence is common in American English. english.stackexchange.com/questions/162234/…
    – JavaLatte
    Mar 25 '16 at 16:52
  • Likely is often used instead of probably in American English. english.stackexchange.com/questions/311266/…
    – JavaLatte
    Mar 25 '16 at 16:55
1

"What you've put together here":

  • something ("what")
  • either nearby or currently the topic of conversation ("here")
  • that the addressee has assembled ("you have put together")

The phrasal verb "put together" is used more often than its synonyms when the object is something written—e.g., research, a report, or a proposal. So a speaker describing such items would be more likely to use this phrase than another. "Put together" also implies that the assembly required effort or creativity.

Example:

You make a list of interesting questions on ell.stackexchange.com and show it to me. I know a friend who could use it. The list is a thing, we are already talking about it, and you assembled it. Further, the list is the written outcome of research, and it took effort. Therefore, I could say, "They would likely be interested in what you've put together here!"

Example:

You and I work at a company. You write a contract that will reduce what a customer pays but keep our profit the same, and you e-mail it to me. The contract is a thing, it is the topic of conversation when I reply, and you constructed it. Additionally, the contract is a written proposal, and it took creativity. Therefore, I could say, "They would likely be interested in what you've put together here!"

Example:

You and I are filling candy bowls. You mix chocolates and hard candies together in a bowl, and I know a friend who likes that combination. The mix is a thing, it is nearby, and you created it. But it is not something written, nor did you need much effort or creativity to make it. I could say, "They would likely be interested in what you've put together here!", and I would be understood. But the word choice would be poor, unless I say it jokingly, acting like you are clever for inventing the combination.

1
  • Someone said that to me. I think you are correct. Thank you
    – Anggie
    Mar 25 '16 at 23:28

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