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What does "move on" mean and who "moves on"

I thought that I've been hurt before
But no one's ever left me quite this sore
Your words cut deeper than a knife
Now I need someone to breathe me back to life

Got a feeling that I'm going under
But I know that I'll make it out alive
If I quit calling you my lover
Move on

  • When you listen to the song, or watch a video of it being sung, is it any easier to tell who is supposed to "move on"? The meaning of lyrics can sometimes be interpreted by watching a performance. – Alan Carmack Mar 28 '16 at 22:05
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"move on" is defined here as

move on To concentrate one's attention or emotions on other matters in recovering from a setback or difficulty: After he was laid off, he moved on and started looking for another job.

In the context of the song, the speaker/singer is saying that he will be able to "make it out alive" if he quits calling her his lover and moves on.

In other words, if he stops dwelling on her he will be better off, and can recover from his heartbreak.

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Stiches by Shawn Mendes? Fantastic song taste by the way ;)

The way I interpreted is that they both need some time apart, because even though he's in love with her, he knows he's going to get hurt again ("I'll be needing stitches")

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In Shawn Mendes' song Stitches, his use of the phrase

Move on

But I know that I'll make it out alive
If I quit calling you my lover
Move on

is slightly ambiguous. He may be using it as a general exclamation to say he is getting over or getting past his bad relationship, as in "I'm moving on".

However, given the cadence when he sings it, also it sounds like he could be telling the person who hurt him to "go away"

Move on
You watch me bleed until I can't breathe

Either way, the idea is that he is "moving past" that relationship.

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Other answers explain what is meant by the phrase move on. While poetry can be ambiguous, in this context, and since the poem is written in a way that the author is addressing his lover, it is most likely that he/she is using the imperative, and telling the lover to "move on".

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